10 poisonous plants to be aware of when purchasing a new home

Just because a home has a big backyard does not mean it is dog friendly. Sometimes there are hidden toxins lurking in the landscape. Before you let your dog loose in the backyard of your new home, make sure that none of the following plants are present.According to Jill Richardson,DVM, of the ASPCA the following are the top 10 poisonous plants to pups:  

Autumn crocus (Colchicum):  Its active ingredient, colchicines, triggers an anti-metabolic effect that can cause rapidly dividing cells, shedding of the gastrointestinal tract, bloody diarrhea, and vomiting.

Azalea (Rhododendron): This popular plant can harm a dog’s cardiovascular system and trigger vomiting or gastrointestinal upset.Daffodil (Narcissus): Toxic ingredients in the bulbs cause convulsions, tremors, lethargy, weakness, and upset stomachs.

Hyacinth (Hyacinth): This popular plant can cause severe vomiting, bloody diarrhea, depression, and tremors.

Japanese yew (Taxis): Extremely toxic to dogs, this group of ornamental plants can cause seizures or cardiac failure. The plant and red berries are toxic.

Lily of the valley (Convalaria): This plant can cause heart failure, coordination problems, and vomiting.

Oleander (Nerium): Extremely toxic, this popular outdoor plant contains cardiac glycosides that harm the heart, decrease body temperature, cause abnormal pulse rate, and can cause death. Beware: Even people have died from eating hot dogs roasted on an oleander twig.

Rhubarb (Rheum): Although the stalks are used to make pies, the leaves pack the potential to cause kidney damage.

Sago palm (Cycads): Resembling an upside down pineapple, this plant thrives in sandy soils, especially in warmer states such as California, Texas, and Florida. A few seeds can kill a dog.

Tomato (Lycopersicion):Surprisingly, the greenery of this common plant, not the tomato itself, contains solanine, a toxic ingredient that can prompt gastric upset, depression, weakness, and a decrease in heart rate.

Because of all the rainy weather I have noticed some large mushrooms growing in my backyard.  Dr. Richardson recommends keeping dogs away from all mushrooms just to be on the safe side. 

For more information on poisonous plants, tap into the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center or the American Veterinary Medical Association website.

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Published in: on January 11, 2008 at 7:12 pm  Leave a Comment  
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